Black And White Emotional Portraits

best black and white pictures Black And White Emotional Portraits

best black and white pictures Black And White Emotional Portraits

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Ted Grant said, “When you photograph people in color, you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in black and white, you photograph their souls.” I have always loved this quote because it sums up exactly why I love black and white photography.

Do you struggle with capturing genuine emotion in your images, or does it come easily for you? Do you have any other tips about capturing emotion to share? Please share in the comments below.

After the editing process is done and I deliver my final galleries to my clients, I don’t include every image in black and white. I don’t think every image converts well to black and white. I use a monochrome edit when I can identify an image with good lighting, contrast between highlights and shadows (a true white and a true black) and a powerful emotion or connection in the image.

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During family sessions, getting mom or dad to play along and be over-the-top silly, almost always helps elicit laughs from the kids. It’s a good idea to tell the parents in advance that you’re going to ask them to be silly and ridiculous, but that if they just roll with it, the kids will smile and laugh in a natural way. They won’t if you just say, “look here and smile!”

Starting in black and white photography taught me that it’s not enough to have perfectly matched clothing, or a brightly colored chandelier hanging from a tree in the woods. It’s not enough to stand someone in front of a beautiful backdrop and tell them to smile. Compelling photographs do more than that. They give you a glimpse into what the person being photographed is feeling right at that moment.

When I identify these criteria and convert the image to black and white, I find black and white photography isolates emotion in a way that color cannot. It’s then that I am free to feel the human experience on a much deeper level. Those are my favorite images.

In my experience, the key to capturing emotion, is helping your subjects to actually feel the same emotion that you’re trying to capture during the session. One simple and effective tip is to remember that humans naturally mimic the emotions and attitudes of those around them. As the photographer, if you come into the session laughing and joking around, it’s much more likely that the people you’re photographing will start to laugh and joke around as well.

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How black and white photography pulls out the emotion in a photo

Simply put, we have too many distractions. The minimalist movement and mindfulness meditation are gaining mass popularity for a reason. They require us to focus on the present and rise above the din of our distracted lives. It sounds easy, but it’s actually quite hard to turn off the “monkey brain” and breathe (insert yogi pranayama breath here). However, it is clear that when we remove the clutter, we feel renewed and centered, and we can focus on what matters.

Ted Grant–an amazing Canadian photojournalist–has said, “When you photograph people in color, you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in black and white, you photograph their souls!” While I’ve certainly seen my fair share of color photos that beautifully capture emotion, I also relate to Grant’s words very much.

My first experience with photography was a black and white film photography class in high school. We were given one roll of film per week, and told to, “go capture something compelling.” Though learning photography on a fully manual, very low-tech camera, resulted in a bit of a learning curve when I switched over to digital (hello metering modes, back button focus, and exposure compensation!), one of the most important things that my first black and white photography class taught me was the importance of capturing emotion in photography.

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For kids, try asking them about their favorite movie, TV show, or the best part of their week so far. If you don’t have children around the same age as the ones you’re photographing, it’s a good idea to ask the parents in advance about the sorts of books, songs, TV shows, movies, and/or sports their children enjoy so that you can prepare thoughtful questions that will allow them to talk about the things they love.

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So, keep a book of silly knock knock jokes tucked into your camera bag, or come prepared to tell a funny story that happened to you recently. If you’re having a bad day, make the conscious decision to leave it behind for the duration of your session, and even fake it until you make it if you must. It really does make a difference!

Focus is an essential aspect not only to life but also to photography. For the purposes of this article, I am not talking about “nailing focus” in photography. Albeit, knowing how to nail focus is essential, I am referring to focus as in the main purpose or intention of the photograph. What is the emotion or connection the photographer is trying to capture in the image?

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It seems harder than ever to focus on what really matters. As I sit and write this article (which, by the way, has lingered on my to-do list for well over a month), text messages, tweets, Facebook notifications and calendar reminders chime in on my phone, in a seemingly constant effort to derail my focus. If I succumb to that Siren’s Song, I will fall into a social media rabbit hole of wasted time.

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Despite my undeniable love for vivid color images soaked in soft golden hour lighting, I sometimes think color can be a distraction. Often, our eyes might take in a rich, beautiful photograph, but emotionally we do not connect to the subjects. In newborn photography, maybe it’s the safari crib sheet that pulls us away from the mother-daughter connection; in portrait photography, perhaps it’s the magenta headband that distracts us from the person wearing it. If we strip away the color, the subject emerges and we are able to connect.

When photographing couples, asking them to tell you a story about how they met, got engaged, or the best part of their wedding, are all topics that can help cultivate real emotions during your session. Ask the question, then wait and watch carefully, with camera in hand, for interaction between the couple during the story.

As a photographer, there’s no exact science to capturing emotion in your photos. Some children will be naturally expressive, and some couples will be naturally affectionate. Other people may need a bit of help getting comfortable enough to express themselves in front of the camera. As always, building rapport with the people that you’re photographing, before and during the session, will go a long way in helping them relax and feel comfortable.

As a family photographer who specializes in lifestyle work, my main goal is to document the everyday moments and candid emotions for my clients. Ultimately, I want to create images that make my clients feel.

In a sense, black and white photography strips away all the extras, and forces you to think about things like contrast and emotion, in a way that isn’t always be as crucial when you’re shooting in color. Whether intentional or not, it can be easy to use color and props as a sort of crutch in photography. I love a photo of a toddler licking a giant multi-colored lollipop just as much as the next person. But, the tendency with images like that can sometimes be for the color and the whimsy to carry the image, rather than the emotion.

I no longer shoot exclusively in black and white, nor am I arguing that black and white photography is the only way to capture emotional images. Ones that capture real emotions will be compelling whether they are processed in color or in black and white. However, upon reflecting on my personal journey in photography, I can clearly see that beginning with black and white photography forced me to prioritize emotion in my images over color, props, and styling, in a way that has strengthened my photography overall.

How Black and White Photography Taught Me to Capture Emotion

I do recommend shooting black and white right in camera for this exercise, because it completely eliminates color from the equation. It’s a quick and easy way to see which images are successful in black and white, and which are not. It also helps train your brain to “think” in black and white. Once you’ve completed this quick exercise, take a look at your images. Are your black and white images compelling? If not, one of the reasons may be that the images are lacking emotion.

As funny as it sounds, another method that’s really effective in making people laugh is to actually ask them to fake laugh. Ask them to be silly and to give you their biggest and deepest Santa Claus chuckle. It will feel weird and awkward, but the end result is usually that everyone around starts genuinely laughing, and that’s the moment you’re waiting for as the photographer.

If you’ve never had experience shooting exclusively in black and white, I highly suggest giving it a try. Most digital cameras have the capacity to shoot black and white right in camera (consult your manual). It’s a really great exercise to occasionally force yourself to do so. Grab a friend, and go shoot 50 or 100 frames in black and white.

Black And White Emotional Portraits