Another crucial element that affects contrast is the type of film you shoot with all bw films dont react the same way and its important that you choose
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Black and white portrait

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Black And White Film Photography Portraits.

Dodge and Burn. Dodging and burning is a avenue that comes from the traditional darkroom and is usually used to burn in or darken highlights and hold back (brighten) shadows. Photoshop’s Dodge and Burn tools allow a level of control that film photographers may only dream of because you may target the highlights, shadows or mid-tones with both. This means that you could use the Burn tool to darken highlights when they are too bright, or the Dodge tool to brighten up them to grow local contrast. It’s a good practice of sharing a sense of superior sharpness and enhancing texture. Plus, because you can set the opacity of the tools, you can build up her effect gradually so the impact is subtle and there are no hard edges.

Shoot RAW + JPEG. The most excellent monochrome conversions are arrived at by editing raw files which have the full colour information, but if you shoot raw and JPEG files simultaneously and set the camera to its monochrome photograph Style/Picture Control/Film Simulation mode you get an indication of how the image will look in black and white. As numerous photographers struggle to visualise a scene in black and white, these monochrome modes are an invaluable tool that will help with composition and scene assessment. many cameras are also capable of producing decent in-camera monochrome images these days and it’s worth experimenting with image parameters (usually contrast, sharpness, filter effects and toning) to find a look that you like. Because compact road cameras and compact cameras show the scene seen by the sensor with camera settings applied, users of these cameras are able to preview the monochrome image in the electronic viewfinder or on rear screen before taking the shot. DSLR users should also do this if they activate his camera’s live supposition policy , but the usually slower responses mean that most will find it preferable or check the image on the screen post-capture.

Take Control. Although coloured filters can still be used to manipulate contrast when shooting digital black and white images, it’s more prominent to save this work until the processing stage. Until a a couple years ago Photoshop’s Channel Mixer was the favorite means of turning colour images monochrome, but now Adobe Camera Raw has more powerful tools (in the HSL/Grayscale tab) that allow you to adjust the brightness of eight individual colours that make up the image. It’s possible to adjust single of these colours to make it anything from white to black with the sliding control. However, it’s important to keep an eye on the whole image when adjusting a particular colour as subtle gradations should become unnatural looking. And adjusting the brightness of a red or pinkish shirt with the red sliding control, for moment , will have an impact on the model’s skin, especially the lips. The Levels and Curves controls should also be used to manipulate tonal range and contrast, but the HSL/Grayscale controls allow you to create demarcation between objects of the same brightness but with diverse colours.

Use Filters. Graduated neutral density (AKA ND grad) and polarizing filters are simply as advantageous in monochrome photography as they are in colour. In fact, because they manipulate image contrast they are arguably more advantageous . An ND grad is cooperative when you require to retain detail in a bright sky while a polarizing filter can be used to reduce reflections and boost contrast. Alternatively, think taking two or more shots with different exposures to create a high dynamic range (HDR) composite. Don’t be anxious to use a ND grad with a standard neural density filter if the sky is brighter than the foreground in a long exposure shot. Coloured filters, which are an essential tool for monochrome film photographers, should also be advantageous for manipulating contrast in digital images. They work by darkening objects of his opposite colour while lightening objects of her own. An orange filter, for example, will darken the blue of the sky while a green one will lighten foliage.

Try Long Exposure. Long exposure shots could work really well in monochrome photography, especially where there’s moving water or clouds. During the exposure the highlights of the water, for example, are recorded across a wider place than they would with a short exposure and this can help enhance tonal contrast. The blurring of the movement also adds textural contrast with any solid objects in the frame. If required , use a neutral density filter such as Lee Filters’ Big Stopper or Little Stopper to reduce exposure and extend shutter speed (by 10 and 4 stops respectively). naturally , when exposures extend farther than as to 1/60 sec a tripod is wanted to keep the camera still and avoid blurring. It’s also advisable to use a remote release and mirror lock-up to minimise vibration and produce super-sharp images.

Look for Contrast, Shape and Texture. The complimentary and opposing colours that bring a colour image to life are all reduced to black and white or shades of grey in a monochrome image and you have to look for tonal contrast to make a shot stand out. In colour photography, for example, your eye would instantaneously be drawn to a red object on a green background, but in monochrome photography these two areas are likely to have the same brightness, so the image looks flat and dowdy straight from the camera. happily , it’s possible to work adjust the brightness of these two colours separately to introduce some contrast. However, a great starting point is to look for scenes with tonal contrast. There are always exceptions, but as a general rule look for scenes that contain some forceful blacks and whites. This could be achieved by the light or by the brightness (or tone) of the objects in the scene as well as the exposure settings that you use. The brightness of the bark of a silver birch tree for example, could inject some contrast (and interest) in to a woodland scene. Setting the exposure for these brighter areas also makes the shadows darker, so the highlights stand out even more. Look for shapes, patterns and textures in a scene and move around to find the best composition.

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To enter, tag your photo with the #TheDarkroomLab_BWportrait, explain the photo well in the caption, tell us the film type, the camera used, and where you got it developed (hopefully The Darkroom!). Deadline for submission is October 31, 2017. Remember, it has to be black & white film and it has to be a portrait. We can’t wait to see your entries. Until then, good luck!

For over 40 years, we have developed literally millions of rolls of film and we still love it! Most of us have been doing it for a long time – A.J., Ronnie, Joe, Emmanuel, Aimee, Nancy, Chris, Glen, Keith, Jay, Cyrus, Philip – all with at least 10 years in the craft. We love cameras of all types, as well as the trippy, new films. The Darkroom… Lots of experience and lots of love!Learn more about The Darkroom.

November 8, 2017 / By Trevor Lee / In Film Photography Contests

Winners Selected – “Black & White Portraiture” Film Photography Contest

1. Upload your FILM photographs to our Facebook wall or post to your Instagram page.  Be sure to tag us and use the #TheDarkroomLab_BWportrait hashtag.  thedarkroomlab instagram.com/thedarkroomlab  thedarkroomlab facebook.com/thedarkroomlab

**Please note that our Facebook wall is private so you wont see your post on our wall but you can see it in the “Visitor Posts” section.**

Our staff will pick up to 12 images from photo submissions and those finalists will be posted on Facebook and Instagram for all to like. The photo that receives the most combined likes will be the contest winner. Contest is for film images only. Judging criteria will be based on subject matter, descriptive caption/photo details, composition and overall quality in adherence with the theme. Photos submission can be used on The Darkroom website or contest promotions, and credit will be given to photographers where appropriate. By entering, you are warranting that you own full rights to the photo, and you indemnify and hold The Darkroom harmless from any claims to the contrary. The Darkroom reserves the right to modify the rules of this contest should it be deemed necessary for clarification or other purposes. By submitting your photo to the contest, you are agreeing to these terms.

This contest will run September 10 through October 31 , 2017.

3rd place with 1,236 combined likes, Matt Allen’s Mural portrait, shot on a medium format Bronica ETRS with Kodak Tri-X 400.

There’s something awesome about portraits captured on black & white film.  With color out of the equation, monochrome tones highlight what’s most important: the person – their expression, their distinct features, and emotion. We always enjoy seeing your black & white captures. For that reason, we are excited to announce our next film photography contest

The “B&W Portraiture” contest images have been selected and Facebook & Instagram likes have been tallied. Here are the winners;

Thank you all for your beautiful submissions and meaningful captions! With 13,319 total finalist likes, this was our best contest to date – they just keep getting better! If you didn’t win this time, there’s always our next contest which will be announced in the coming week!

Captured on Ilford FP5 125 with a Nikon FM & 50mm f/1.8 by Mimi Connelly.

2. Caption it – In the caption, tell us about the photo, where you’re from, the film and camera that captured it, and tag #TheDarkroomLab_World. Contest Ends – October 31, 2017

For a chance to win one many great film cameras from our Camera Bar all you have to do is post one of your film photos on our Facebook wall or on your Instagram.  Be sure to tag us, use the #TheDarkroomLab_BWportrait, explain the photo well in the caption, and tell us the film type, camera used, and where you got it developed (hopefully The Darkroom!). *You are limited to one submission.  If multiple photos are posted we will only consider the first submission. This contest is a U.S. only contest*

1st place 3,046 combined likes, John Carleton’s “Dreaming” photo of his daughter on Across 100 and taken with Pentax 6×7!

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2nd place with 1,273 likes, Olivia Hutcherson’s “A coming of age.” portrait of her father, captured on her trusty Canon AE-1 with Kodak Tri-X 400tx.

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