Black And White Photographers Contemporary

best black and white pictures Black And White Photographers Contemporary

best black and white pictures Black And White Photographers Contemporary

John sexton john sexton is perhaps the most widely known contemporary black and white landscape photographer
Wonderfully timeless contemporary photography by croatia born photographer stanko abadžic
Bob kolbrener bob kolbreners passion for fine art black and white photography
The best photographers working in black and white
Sensors of all modern cameras only capture black and white and then automatically calculate the red green and blue tints according to the luminance in
Still life the object as subject museum of contemporary photography
Modern american street photography by markus hartel new york
Scott typaldosphotography scott typaldos
Alain laboile la famille 2014 lensculture lifestyle photographyvintage photographyblack white
Another innovation is the use of trendy black and white photographs these photos emphasize the mix of contemporary and classic jewelry designs two of the
Modern american street photography by markus hartel new york ages black and white
Lowrysky modern architecture
Michael kenna born is an english photographer best known for his black white landscapes kenna attended upholland college in lancashire the ban
Shape of light 100 years of photography and abstract art exhibition at tate modern tate
Hot air balloons
Stella sidiropoulou late night jazz · contemporary photographersblack white
Black and white is of course where photography began but is not at all where it has ended up however some contemporary photographers have reclaimed
Black and white
Croatia born photographer stanko abadžic finds beauty in simple moments shot in black and · contemporary photographyblack white
Vaughn hutchins

I’ve compiled a list of famous photographers who have had a decisive influence on photography as an art form as we know it today. I’ve categorized the photographers in several genres that are considered fine art genres.

If you’re a serious photographer and don’t know the photographers or their work yet, then you really should start getting to know them!

Steichen partnered with Stieglitz in 1900, which resulted in the making of Camera Work.

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22 new images from this French master of intimate family photography — celebrating the joys and freedom and playfulness of carefree childhood “at the edge of the world.”

Quote: “Anything that excites me for any reason, I will photograph; not searching for unusual subject matter, but making the commonplace unusual.”

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Quote: “It is not art in the professionalized sense about which I care, but that which is created sacredly, as a result of a deep inner experience, with all of oneself, and that becomes ‘art’ in time.”

One of the greatest portrait and editorial photographers of the past century who made many famous portraits of equally famous people. From Muhammed Ali and Kennedy to Churchill, Bogart and Hepburn: they were all iconized in front of Karsh’ camera. Karsh was known to give significant importance to the hands of his subjects, as any good portrait photographer would do, and he would lit their hands separately. Many of his photographs are familiar to many people even though they might not know the artist behind it.

3. Henri Cartier Bresson – 1908 – 2004 – Street photographer, photo-essayist, co-founder of Magnum photography. H-C B coined “The Decisive moment” to reflect that there’s a unique moment in photography when everything falls into place for the perfect composition to express a meaningful message.

It’s highly intuitive and it cannot be repeated. Bresson was a master at that and created many iconic photographs that expressed this “Decisive moment’ and hereby elevating street or candid photography to an art form.

Many street photographers after him have tried to capture the Decisive moment photograph, but only a few succeeded. One of them who should be mentioned is Andre Kertesz from whom Bresson gained inspiration.

Kertesz called his Decisive Moment, “The delayed snapshot”.

Long exposure black and white minimalistic photography is quite a popular genre the last years and is still gaining in popularity. But despite the long list of great long exposure photographers of late it all started with Michael Kenna. Perhaps not the first long exposure photographer – who can tell? – but surely the photographer who was at the start of long exposure photography as a very popular genre. Kenna’s long exposure photographs are often times focused on night time long exposure photography with exposure times extending to 5 hours or more, of course using analog cameras. But besides the typical long exposure photographs with mainly seascapes and a famous series with nuclear power plants, called Power Station, Kenna also created a breathtaking series of lone trees in the snow. Michael Kenna, truly an artist who had a decisive influence on today’s photography.

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Best of August 2018: Deadlines for Competitions, Grants, Festivals and More

This series of self portraits were made in a psychiatric hospital after a suicide attempt. They offer an artful and emotional window into the gaping maw of depression, anxiety, confusion, fear and loneliness.

“The silence of the impressive landscape and the miles of solitude consistently brought me back to my own self. The experiences I had there were essential in my search for a silence that I had somehow lost along the way.”

Announcing the Winners & Finalists – 2018 Street Photography Awards!

The photographers are randomly ordered and the order doesn’t reflect any ranking nor does this pretend to be an extensive list.

Deep inside long-forgotten underground cities, photographer/explorer Jeff Gusky has discovered incredibly preserved remains from the First World War that bring this 100-year-old conflict back to life.

Chang Chao-Tang, Looking Back at a Giant of Taiwanese Photography

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Bringing together themes of adolescence, death, and motherhood, an expansive exhibition of Sally Mann’s work—featuring more than 100 images—traces the photographer’s experience growing up and raising children in the American South.

Our editors have put together a curated list of worthwhile (and imminent) deadlines for photographers, as well as some upcoming festivals around the world—have a look and best of luck! 

Experimental double exposures and layered photographs create imagined landscapes where objects and situations appear in apparent disorder and create spaces “where beliefs of any kind can be real.”

Gritty black-and-white photography from Japan — celebrating beauty in the ordinary and mundane of everyday life.

4. Hiroshi Sugimoto: Japanese artist whose work can be seen on the U2 Album cover, ‘No line on the horizon’

A new, expanded reprint of this classic photobook still has the power to make the viewer feel disturbed, uneasy, and not quite sure what to make of these staged scenes of marginalized people in South Africa.

Quote: “To photograph is to hold one’s breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It’s at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy”

2. Richard Avedon: One of my favourite portrait/fashion photographers who created many iconic photographs of celebrities

5. Nick Brandt: Still alive and relatively young compared to the mostly deceased photographers listed here. He documented the disappearing world of the African landscape, mainly wildlife with a strong fine art approach.

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Quote: “Photographing at night can be fascinating because we lose some of the control over what happens in front of the camera. Over a period of time the world changes; rivers flow, planes fly by, clouds pass and the earth’s position relative to the stars is different. This accumulation of time and events, impossible for the human eye to take in, can be recorded on film. For the photographer, real can become surreal, which is exciting. During the day, when most photographs are made, scenes are usually viewed from the vantage-point of a fixed single light source, the sun. At night the light can come from unusual and multiple sources. There can be deep shadows which act as catalysts for our imagination. There is often a sense of drama, a story about to be told, secrets revealed, actors about to enter onto the stage. The night has vast potential for creativity.”

2. Alfred Stieglitz 1864 – 1946 – Some say he’s the spiritual father of fine art photography. Founded Camera Work, a quarterly journal, considered to be the best and most beautiful photo magazine ever made.

Created a series of photos that only depicted clouds without any other reference points, called Equivalents, which can be seen as the start of fine-art in photography. Later on, Minor White wrote a famous essay on Equivalents, explaining Stieglitz’ concepts behind Equivalents.

The clouds as subject matter didn’t matter, it was the feeling conveyed and the symbolism that mattered. Stieglitz was also a friend of Steichen and co-founder of the Photo-Secession, a movement that promoted fine art photography.

Creator of iconic photographs like the Steerage, Spring Showers and several series of portraits of Georgia O’Keeffe

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An updated view of street photography from photographers in 24 countries on five continents.

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Quote: “It’s not always easy to stand aside and be unable to do anything except record the sufferings around one.”

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© Henri Cartier BressonTop 10 photographers who influenced photography to become what it is today (and any serious photographer should know)

Italian photographer Valerio Bispuri spent ten years in South America photographing 74 different prisons. His astonishingly ambitious project combines photography, anthropology, and journalism to try to understand the continent through its prisons, which he feels represent the brutal and hidden reality of a country.

Agoston’s macro close-ups of living plants reveal an intricate world the human eye is only privy to with a lens. She brings us the beauty of the natural world with stunning detail.

Of course this list doesn’t pretend to be an exhausting list; I could name at least a dozen other photographers who were equally important in the development of fine art photography in the past century.

But then it wouldn’t be a top 10 obviously. But if you’re interested I’m listing five other names here that are worth looking up and exploring:

Environmental portrait photographer. Arnold Newman took the art of portraiture to another level by trying to include the natural habitat of his subjects in his photographs. Newman did that in a way that also gives an indication of the profession and passions of his subjects. Many times he framed his subjects, very often other famous artists like painters, musicians and architects, in such a way that they became part of their own artistic creations. Newman kept records of his photography sessions in so called ‘sitting books’ in which he would record details of that session.  The two pages below depict the sessions with composer Igor Stravinsky for probably his most famous environmental portrait photograph.

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Using a digital black-and-white film filter on her smartphone—and photographing in a country on the cusp of a great transition—this photographer attempts to blur the distinction between past and future.

Quote: “I am convinced that any photographic attempt to show the complete man is nonsense. We can only show, as best we can, what the outer man reveals. The inner man is seldom revealed to anyone, sometimes not even the man himself.”

When we’re talking about documentary photography an extensive list of photographers come to mind but Dorothea Lange surely was one of the most prolific in this genre. She received a lot of recognition with her series of photos of migrant families. She documented the consequences the Great Depression had on displaced farm families, commissioned by the Farm Security Administration  When looking at her most famous photograph Migrant Mother, it reminds me, despite the obvious lack of colour, so much of Steve McCurry’s Afghan Woman. I’d say, that Migrant Mother is the Mother of this Afghan woman on more than one level.

Calogero Cammalleri, Lampedusa: Immigration, Tragedy, Reflection

1. Edward Steichen 1872 – 1970 – The most famous representative of the so called pictorialism movement, an art movement that dominated the start of the last century. Considered to be the very first fashion photographer, creator of The Pond – Moonlight, which was the most expensive photograph ever with a price tag of almost $3,000,000 until the likes of Andreas Gursky, Cindy Sherman and Peter Lik broke that record.

Hajime Inomata, Ways of Seeing: On the Streets or from Your Kitchen Window

Quote: “When one sees the residuum of greatness before one’s camera, one must recognize it in a flash. There is a brief moment when all that there is in a man’s mind and soul and spirit may be reflected through his eyes, his hands, his attitude. This is the moment to record. This is the elusive moment of truth”.

Transcendence amidst the commonplace, intimacy amidst alienation, humor amidst the absurd—over five decades, Chang Chao-Tang has helped shape the photographic culture of his homeland.

5. Ansel Adams 1902 – 1984. Arguably one of the best known American photographers. The way we perceive and assess a black and white photograph up to this day, is largely formed by Ansel Adams’ contributions for elevating black and white photography to an art form.

The term zone system was invented by him and he described how a good black and white should look like: good coverage of all tonal zones and a result of perceiving a scene in his mind’s eyes: visualization.

His knowledge and teachings are documented in a 3 Volume book called “The Camera”, “The Negative” and “The Print”, which is considered to be the best text book on (black and white) photography ever written and largely still apply to modern day’s digital photography.

Adams was also known for manipulating his images in the dark room to align it with his vision, his ‘pre-visualization’, rather than to accept the original negative as it is. Look at the video to get an impression of Adams’ post processing in the darkroom and how much he manipulated his images and how his famous photograph “Moon over Hernandez” looked like in a straight print without any manipulation.

4. Robert Capa – 1913 – 1954 – War photographer, photo-essayist, co-founder of Magnum. His most famous, and at the same time a disturbing and iconic photograph, is a photo of the Spanish Civil war that depicts a man at the moment he’s being shot to death, called The Falling Soldier.

 The term Generation X was coined by Capa, who used it as a title for a photo-essay. During the first Indochina war, while being commissioned for a photo reportage of that war, he stepped on a landmine and became one of the casualties of one of the wars he documented so successfully.

Back in 2007 on a episode of the Antiques Roadshow, a collection of 23 issues of Camera Work was valued at a price of $ 60,000 to $ 90,000. You can view the entire collection of images that Camera Work published on photogravure.com.

In this Ultra-Orthodox neighborhood in Jerusalem, the inhabitants have chosen to reject modern, secular culture and embrace traditional religious life. An outsider has expertly used the language of street photography to explore this 21st century society.

A personal journey of return to a homeland that has become symbolic of a turning point (both good and bad) for African migrants seeking a better life in Italy and Europe.

This Belgrade-born, Brooklyn-based photographer shoots almost exclusively with black and white film; his work is the real deal. From gangs in New York City projects to skinheads in Serbia, from the streets of Tokyo to the back roads of Kingston… Yeah, we’re not trying to romanticize it, but he roams wide and deep, and catches potent, definitive moments effortlessly amidst the chaos. It’s photojournalism so good, it’s art. The grayscale, grainy grittiness is a perfect stylistic fit.

Cinematic and darkly captured: a European-wide art project that celebrate the idea of the flâneur within the contemporary urban fabric of the continent.

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Quote: “Photography is a medium of formidable contradictions. It is both ridiculously easy and almost impossibly difficult. It is easy because its technical rudiments can readily be mastered by anyone with a few simple instructions. It is difficult because, while the artist working in any other medium begins with a blank surface and gradually brings his conception into being, the photographer is the only imagemaker who begins with the picture completed. His emotions, his knowledge, and his native talent are brought into focus and fixed beyond recall the moment the shutter of his camera has closed.”

“I feel like a mermaid. My body tells me that I am a man but my soul tells me that I am a woman…” A penetrating, multi-year report on a unique group of people—who fall outside of Western notions of gender—trying to carve out a…

by Joel Tjintjelaar | Mar 24, 2015 | Blog, most popular | 6 comments

Here are 16 projects published by LensCulture that were among the most popular with our readers worldwide this year. Enjoy!

1. Julius Shulman: One of the greatest architectural photographers ever.

Night falls, and the sea comes alive. Using pencil-thin light beams, the North Sea becomes a canvas for the waves to draw, track, and map themselves. Launched into the sea, the light combines with the natural power of the tides to begin the process of creating unique drawings. More than simple seascapes, these black-and-white images reveal the Earth’s natural creativity.

Quote: “I am trying here to say something about the despised, the defeated, the alienated. About death and disaster, about the wounded, the crippled, the helpless, the rootless, the dislocated. About finality. About the last ditch.”

Boogie    Daido Moriyama    Joel Peter Witkin    Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison    Roger Ballen    Sally Mann

Once a given, the absence of color in photography from the last few decades is now a deliberate choice, not a technological limitation. So why would a modern photographer opt for black and white, forgoing those vivid Lomo hues or subtle customized tones of an advanced SLR? Here are a few current big shots who don’t care for color, for whom shooting in black and white allows a specific style, a certain punch, a special magic their vision demands. Check ’em out in our slideshow and let us know if we missed anyone.

Artist Filip Berendt mosaicks together his own abstract memories of hallucinogenic experiences.

While working as a valet at a Veterans Affairs Hospital, M L Casteel created a series that uses photographs of car interiors to illustrate the psychological repercussions of war. 

Moments of adolescent metamorphosis that rise above cliché. These photos capture the awkward unease of teenagers on the cusp of innocence, awareness and becoming something different, not yet adults, but no longer care-free children.

Edward is regarded as one of the great American photographers who mastered the landscape, the portrait and the still life photograph. Especially known for his famous photographs of a pepper that many photography students still try to emulate. What not many people know is that Weston described the concept of pre-visualization at least ten years earlier than Ansel Adams who made this a term that every photographer today knows about. Together with Ansel Adams he was part of a group of San Francisco photographers called Group f/64 who emphasized the precisely focused and correctly exposed subject.

Even in today’s super-saturated world of rich, bright and dazzling colors, black-and-white photography continues to offer an unmistakable aesthetic power. A passing instant rendered timeless; a landscape’s form brought into sharp relief—in its simplicity lies its power.

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Black and white photography holds a graphic emotional power unlike any other form of the medium. Here are several of the most popular and inspiring series from this year.

Quote: “Dodging and burning are steps to take care of mistakes God made in establishing tonal relationships”

Black And White Photographers Contemporary