Black And White Photography Camera

March 8, 2019 7:35 am by columnblogger
Camera walks ansel adams gallery
36 nicon red black white camera
Black And White Photography Camera

News & Insight Want A Fuji Monochrome? | Now You Can Have A Fuji Camera Dedicated To Black & White

This process works quite well—all major-brand digital cameras except Sigma’s use this method on amateur as well as pro-oriented models (see the “Sigma/Foveon” sidebar). However, the demosaicing process does have some drawbacks. First, a lot of light is wasted, since the colored filters block two-thirds of the light from reaching each pixel. Second, the demosaicing process produces aliasing—moiré, color artifacts and the like. To combat this, most sensors also include an anti-aliasing (AA) filter, or optical low-pass filter (OLPF), which slightly blurs the image at the pixel level to minimize moiré. This, of course, also slightly reduces overall image sharpness.

It’s a bit ironic considering the Leica cachet, but the M Monochrom is far and away the lowest-cost monochrome digital camera available today. It’s essentially a classic Leica M rangefinder camera, but with an 18-megapixel, full-frame (35.8×23.9mm) monochrome CCD sensor that has no RGB filter grid and no AA filter (but it does have an IR filter to cut off wavelengths longer than 700nm). Like all M-series Leica cameras, the M Monochrom can use the full lineup of legendary Leica M lenses (from 16mm to 135mm), and each frames just as it does on a traditional 35mm Leica M camera, thanks to the full-frame sensor. ISO range is 320-10,000 (and there’s even an auto ISO feature). Unlike most digital cameras, the M Monochrom has a histogram that displays the unprocessed, unmodified raw data, rather than data for a camera-processed JPEG image—very helpful for nailing those RAW exposures (the camera shoots DNG RAW files, as well as JPEGs). You can tone JPEGs in-camera. Digital aspects aside, the M Monochrom is a Leica M camera, with quick and easy rangefinder focusing, quiet operation, and a rugged body featuring top and base plates of machined brass and a housing manufactured from a single piece of magnesium alloy. Dimensions are 5.5×3.1×1.5 inches, weight is 21.2 ounces (body only). Estimated Street Price: $7,200. us.leica-camera.com

Dan has been modifying cameras since ’97 and does engineering type work for cameras of all kinds of applications from industrial agriculture, to well, whatever else you can think of. The Fuji work has happened a bit more recently as he said the X-Trans is a bit tricky to work with, stating that the cover glass is glued on with a strong agent, and getting it off without damaging the tiny gold wires was a real problem. Never deterred, Dan persisted and many tens of sensors later has overcome and has it down to a science now; a method that makes him the only person to do this right with consistency.

Actually, to be more specific, *they* exist. I spoke today with Dan Llewellyn, President of MaxMax, a kind of skunkworks lab that, among many other things too sophisticated for me to get into, converts some Fuji cameras to monochrome versions, and you can either send your own camera in or they’ll buy it and convert it for you with only about a week turnaround time.

Today, there are three basic monochrome digital cameras on the market, from Leica, Phase One and RED. They range in price from over $7,000 to over $40,000, and that’s their primary drawback. But in terms of monochrome image quality, they offer the best there is.

A monochrome (or black-and-white) photo can be nostalgic, timeless, beautiful and these days there are a few ways to capture one. Many digital cameras have monochrome modes. You can also edit photos with programs like Photoshop and Lightroom, or by using a RAW converter, that turn your color photo into a monochrome photo. For the best monochrome photos, however, you really want a camera that doesn’t collect color information at all, and they’re a decidedly rare breed.

Tags:leicablack and whiteX-PRO2x100fujfilmxpro-1leica m monochrom

There are a few caveats, however, and if you’re not greedy, and are really specific, there are specialty cameras out there to suit. The first to come to mind would be the Leica M Monochrom, a beautiful mutant with a CCD missing a color gene that means it’s a purpose shooter with uncompromising dedication to black and white. It actually records only true luminance values in order to deliver the true b&w shots. That allows, technically, for more contrast, sharpness, and according to Leica, a ‘finer resolution that that of medium format.’ They also tout its ability for sharp photos with fine grain up to 10,000 ISO. But it costs $7,500, and that’s without glass.

Editor’s Note: If you’re looking for a more affordable option, we suggest looking into the Sigma dp3 Quattro ($899+). It’s not a true monochrome camera, as its Foveon Quattro sensor can still capture color, but the sensor doesn’t use traditional light filters and it instead derives colors without demosaicing, resulting in more accurate monochrome photos.

(You can read more about the technology, here.) All Sigma’s new dp1, dp2 and dp3 Quattro compacts have a Foveon sensor.

Phase One’s IQ3 100MP Achromatic is a digital back that allows any IQ3 XF medium-format camera to shoot black-and-white-only photos. Announced in 2017, the digital back has a brand new 101-megapixel CMOS sensor with a max ISO of 51,200, making it that most light sensitive medium format digital back that you can currently purchase. It also has an electronic shutter button, built-in wifi and can capture up to 60-minute long exposures. This camera back is really designed for photographers looking to take super high-resolution photos of architecture and landscapes. At at $50,000 for the back alone, they probably need to be serious photographers.

Note that all digital images can suffer from aliasing—when you sample real-world scenes with a fine grid array, some aliasing (“stair-stepped” edges, moiré, etc.) will occur if the pattern of the subject is the right size and at the angle to conflict with the sampling grid. The finer the pixel grid, the less likely this is to happen, so more and more DSLRs and mirrorless cameras today are doing away with the AA filter as pixel counts go up. And medium-format digital cameras have never used AA filters. Aliasing—when it occurs—can be corrected in post-processing, as medium-format users have operated from the start.

The 17 Best Outdoor Photography Accessories, According to the Pros

Leica teamed up with clothing company Rag & Bone to make the stealthiest camera ever and it’s basically perfect. Read the Story

It’s really Apple Music or bust with the HomePod, which is why if you want Apple’s newest smart speaker you need to make the switch to Apple Music.

The 3 Most Important Products Unveiled at 2018’s Samsung Unpacked Event

Many still photographers may think of RED as being only for video. However, RED’s DSMCs (Digital Still and Motion Cameras) can produce superb still images, as well as feature-quality video. The EPIC Monochrome features the RED Mysterium-X Monochrome sensor, a 30x15mm unit that can deliver 14-megapixel still images, as well as video up to 5K (5120×2700) at rates up to 59.94 fps. Native ISO is 2000; dynamic range is 13.5 stops (up to 18 stops with RED HDRx). Adapters are available for PL, Canon, Nikon and Leica lenses. RED offers two electronic viewfinders and LCD monitors from 5.0 to 9.0 inches, some with touch-screen capability. Images are saved to REDMAG 1.8-inch SSD units from 48 GB to 512 GB, or the RED MINI-MAG 512 GB. There are two versions of the EPIC Monochrome: the EPIC-M is handmade in California and carries a two-year warranty and a $25,000 price (Brain only), while the production EPIC-X (also made in the U.S.) carries a one-year warranty and a $20,000 price (Brain only). The RED EPIC-M Dragon Monochrome adds 6K (6144×3160) video, 19-megapixel stills and a 16.5-stop dynamic range to the above features, thanks to the Dragon-M sensor with interchangeable DSMC Monochrome OLPF. It sells for $31,500 (Brain only). www.red.com

Converting a color image into monochrome in your computer offers the advantages of lots of control—your home computer is more powerful than the one built into your camera, and can handle more complex algorithms, and specialized monochrome software such as Nik Silver Efex Pro provides powerful conversion and finishing tools. And you can convert any digital image, whether it was shot recently or it’s a scan from an old Kodachrome transparency. Photoshop’s Channel Mixer gives you tremendous control over the tones in the image. (See “Monochrome Conversion” by Ming Thein in this issue for more about using the Channel Mixer.) The main drawback to converting a color image is the same as with using the camera’s monochrome mode: That color original image suffers the effects of demosaicing.

Monochrome photography is a bit different than traditional photography — things like light, shadows, shapes and textures play much more prominent roles. (Since most photographers see in color… this adds another level of difficulty.) But for those who really have a passion for monochrome photography, and they want to take the best quality photo, they should really look into a dedicated monochrome camera. Be forewarned, there aren’t many options and they are all pretty expensive.

You can take a look at a few images below with links to the raw files, but Dan should be adding more soon. Either way, if you’re a digital shooter and a fan of shooting B&W in-camera, as I am, this is a really interesting and exciting option, and perhaps even inspiring.

Sony’s WH-1000XM2 headphones are some of the best you can buy. And they’re 15% off right now.

Sigma’s DSLRs and compact cameras with Foveon X3 image sensors don’t use Bayer filter arrays and demosaicing. Instead, they derive color from the fact that different light wavelengths penetrate silicon to different depths. Foveon sensors stack three pixel layers, in effect, the top layer recording short (blue) wavelengths, the middle layer, medium (green), and the bottom layer, long (red) wavelengths. (It’s really more complicated than that, especially with the latest-generation Foveon Quattro sensors, but it’s simpler to think of it this way.) The result is that these sensors record all three primary colors (as well as full luminance data) at every pixel site, no demosaicing or interpolation required—and, thus, no AA filter required, either. The result is sharper images than produced by Bayer sensors of equal horizontal-by -vertical pixel count—and better monochrome images. The Foveon monochrome images aren’t as good as those from dedicated monochrome sensors, but they’re better than those from Bayer sensors—and the Sigma cameras cost a lot less than the monochrome digital cameras. The Sigma SD1 Merrill DSLR sells for around $1,999, the DP1, DP2 and DP3 Merrill compact cameras (with built-in wide-angle, normal and short tele lenses, respectively), for around $799, and the new dp1, dp2 and dp3 Quattro compacts (with wide, normal and short tele lenses, respectively) for $999. www.sigmaphoto.com

At the moment he’s done X100s and X-Pro 1 which converted are dubbed X100s-M and X-Pro 1-M, but for those of you not satisfied with that, the X-Pro 2 is next, which likely means the X-T2 as well. Excited yet? You should be.

This smart speaker has the potential to control many things that an Amazon Echo, Google Home or Apple HomePod just simply cannot.

But his lack of expected scholastic degrees doesn’t mean much as Dan has the ever-enviable ability to take notice of the details, then self-teach to the point of mastery, which is why he has MIT PhDs calling him for his thoughts, and why Fuji, years ago, was considering getting him to do types of conversions on the S3Pro which he had done upgrades on and they’d seen. They eventually didn’t go with him, choosing instead to do the same work in-house. But all this is just a testament to the fact that your gear is in good and reputable hands, and when you speak to Dan, you can sort of tell he’s like a sort of human-cupboard for technical data and trivia.

You can get both from MaxMax.com and click here for a direct link to the store.

For those who don’t want to spend as much on a monochrome-only digital camera, there’s the third-party company LDP LLC (MaxMax.com), who sells modified versions of the Fuji X100S-M and Fuji X-Pro1-M. They convert Fuji’s X-Trans color sensor cameras to monochrome by removing the color filter array, and, according to MaxMax.com, they perform very well: “Fuji monochrome cameras can compare quite favorably to the Leica M but with higher performance in many respects and with a much lower price.” You can currently purchase the Fuji X-Pro1-M for $2,425 and the Fuji X100S-M for $2,600.

Nikon Announces That It’s About To Announce A Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera

So what’s the cost for this? Yes, there is a premium, but we’re not talking near Leica money. For ASP-C sensors he typically tags on a $1,500 premium (again not just for monochrome but all the other variants he does), and for full frame, monochrome would be about $2,500. The Fuji ones are a bit more challenging so there may be a $100 premium on that, but specifically at the moment the X-Pro 1-M goes for $2,425 and X100s-M is $2,600. So near as makes no difference 1/3rd of a Leica Monochrom.

So when you use your camera’s monochrome mode, or convert a color digital image to monochrome in your computer, you’re working from a color image that was fabricated from a monochrome image using colored filters and complex image processing, and then turned back into monochrome. There must be a better way.

What makes a monochrome camera better? Most conventional digital cameras have color filters laid over its sensor that capture a full-color image — this process is called demosaicing — but these filters also interfere with the sensor’s ability to capture the full spectrum of available light. This means that even though a digital camera’s monochrome mode can do a good job, it’s not going to be able to reach the same black and white levels of a monochrome camera. The advantage of using a conventional digital camera when shooting in monochrome mode, on the flip side, is you can turn black-and-white RAW photos into colored photos after they’ve been taken.

The first thing to address here is Dan himself, who is, for lack of a better term, something of a polymath. Dan isn’t an engineer by degree, opting instead to study finance in college then worked for Electronic Data Systems ending up managing their foreign exchange risks. Then for a change of pace went and worked for a company that made consumer hardware tools, but frustrated with the speed of upward momentum after reaching a ceiling he started his own little company in his basement, setting the tone for MaxMax.

Today in Gear: Halios’ Affordable GMT Diver, Streamlined New Commuter Bags From Bellroy and More

When DSLR users talk about full-frame, they mean 35mm full-frame: a sensor measuring about 36x24mm, the size of a full 35mm film frame. To medium-format users, full-frame means the size of a full 645-format film frame. That would be 6×4.5cm, in theory, more like 56×41.5mm in terms of actual image area. Phase One’s IQ260 Achromatic medium-format digital back (available as a kit with the Phase One 645DF+ camera body, or with mounts to fit many popular medium-format and technical cameras) features a 60-megapixel, full-frame medium-format monochrome CCD sensor that measures a whopping 53.7×40.3mm—more than 2.5X the area of a full-frame 35mm DSLR sensor and 1.5X the area of the 44x33mm sensors found in lower-end medium-format cameras. Besides the huge sensor size and 60 megapixels (and the resulting superb image quality), the back offers a 3.2-inch, 1150K-dot touch-screen display, 13 stops of dynamic range and ISOs from 200-3200. The back is ruggedly constructed of 100% aircraft-grade aluminum, and can be operated as an independent unit, tethered to a computer or wirelessly from an iPad or iPhone using Phase One Capture Pilot. Besides having no Bayer filters or AA filter, the IQ260 Achromatic has no IR cutoff filter, so it can also be used for infrared photography. Estimated Street Price: $44,495. www.phaseone.com

Sony’s Wireless Noise-Canceling Headphones Are $52 Off (Again)

There is: a monochrome camera. The sensors in monochrome digital cameras don’t have color filter arrays because there’s no need. Thus, they record all the light (per the sensor’s quantum efficiency) that falls on each pixel; none is lost to color filters, so sensor sensitivity is, in effect, higher. There’s no demosaicing, and thus no color moiré and no need for the blurring AA filter. So images from a monochrome sensor are inherently sharper than converted color images, and sensitivity is higher. Of course, the monochrome camera can’t produce color images, so you have to consider your needs. Monochrome cameras are quite costly, so most photographers probably will be better off doing monochrome with their regular digital cameras—which can deliver excellent monochrome images despite the drawbacks. But for the monochrome connoisseur, the monochrome camera is the way to go.

Here’s everything you need to know about Samsung’s newest gadgets, including when you can buy them.

Using your camera’s monochrome mode has several advantages. You can use the camera’s built-in filters (including the old black-and-white standbys red, yellow and green), you can view the image in monochrome on the LCD monitor, and if you shoot RAW rather than JPEG, you have the ability to process the resulting file into monochrome or full color after the fact. The primary drawback is that conventional digital sensors, with their Bayer RGB filter arrays, don’t provide optimal monochrome image quality—more on this in a bit.

Conventional image sensors consist of a fine grid of millions of pixels or photodiodes that record light in proportion to its intensity. Each pixel can detect how much light strikes it, but not what color that light is. To provide color information, most manufacturers position a grid of primary-colored filters called a Bayer array (named after the Kodak scientist who devised it) over the pixels, with one primary color, red, green or blue, covering each pixel so that each pixel receives only light of that color. Then, through a process known as demosaicing, the camera’s processor (if you shoot JPEG) or your RAW converter (if you shoot RAW) creates a full-color image, using color data from neighboring pixels and interpolation via complex proprietary algorithms to furnish the missing color data for each pixel.

Getting a camera that has and does everything you want is generally considered a pipe dream, and even if you were able to get close, like Sony a99II close, it would be ephemeral bliss because Moore’s Law suggests tech progresses at a rate that will have you yearning for some new advancement by the time your next birthday came around. As I tend to say, owning the best in camera equipment is like running in a race where the finish line keeps moving.

The Leica M Monochrom is a rangefinder-style digital camera and a true black-and-white shooter. Released in 2012, it’s beloved by most serious photographers, but it’s also known for being quite difficult to use. It doesn’t have autofocus, so you’ll have to adjust the lens’s focus ring — any of Leica’s M-Series of lenses are compatible with the M Monochrom — to capture in-focus photos. Aperture is also controlled by the lens. It doesn’t have great bursting or video shooting (up to 1080p) abilities, either. And it lacks wi-fi, GPS, and NFC, which are all common features on today’s digital cameras. However, the M Monochrom has a 24-megapixel full-frame sensor and flexible ISO (320-25600) and can capture stunningly crisp black-and-white photos. For expert photographers who aren’t scared away by this Leica’s price tag, this is the best monochrome camera you can buy.

There are three basic ways to produce a monochrome (black-and-white) image with a digital camera: Shoot it that way using your camera’s monochrome mode; convert a color image to monochrome using your RAW converter, Photoshop or specialized monochrome software; or shoot with a monochrome digital camera.

The best way to catch up on the day’s most important product releases and stories.

It’s hard to argue against the idea that a big part of Fuji‘s X-line appeal is that it brings rangefinder style favored in Leicas within reach of mortals. Even if using them isn’t really the same feeling, they are joys to use and certainly more versatile, but what if versatility isn’t what you wanted and really it’s a Fuji version of the Leica M Monochrom you dream about? Well, it exists.

Related: Better To Shoot in B&W Or Convert in Post? A Simple and Quick Tip For Shooting Better Black & White Images

Related Images of Black And White Photography Camera
Black and white photographysmokingvintage camera
Black and white camera camera photo cameras cool favorites inspiring picture on favim com
Old camera in black and white
Photo camera and photography image
Free stock photo of black and white person people camera
Free stock photo of camera industry photography vintage
Black white camera close up ready to shoot pics of new outfit
Analogue bw black and white camera canon cute film photo photography
5 best black and white photo editing apps for android
Like this item
Camera photography and sony image tagged with black and white
Bw black and white camera photography photos word
When photography changed the world
Black and white photography stock photo colourbox
Woman holding dslr camera in grayscale photography
Why i shoot film
Bw black and white camera canon photo photographer photography
Camera black and white and photography image
Black And White Viking Images
Black And White Viking Images

Black And White Viking ImagesBlack And White Viking Images Group of vikings are floating on the sea on Drakkar with […]

Black And White Color Photographer
Black And White Color Photographer

Black And White Color PhotographerBlack And White Color Photographer Tips for Processing Night Photography with ON1 … 5 hours ago […]

Black And White Photography With Hint Of Color
Black And White Photography With Hint Of Color

Black And White Photography With Hint Of ColorBlack And White Photography With Hint Of Color The Photographer ToolboxUnlimited Downloads: 500,000+ […]

Fashion Photography Black And White Chanel
Fashion Photography Black And White Chanel

Fashion Photography Black And White ChanelFashion Photography Black And White Chanel Chanel LogoChanel ChanelChanel BlackDior LogoChanel PerfumeChanel RunwayCoco Chanel FashionCoco […]

Black And White Portrait Photography
Black And White Portrait Photography

Black And White Portrait PhotographyBlack And White Portrait Photography The most important part of the majority of portraits are the […]

Black And White Photography Contest 2016
Black And White Photography Contest 2016

Black And White Photography Contest 2016Black And White Photography Contest 2016 Tags :Award Winning Photography Award Winning Photos Monochrome Awards […]