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Black And White Photography Documentary.

Take Control. Although coloured filters may still be used to manipulate contrast when shooting digital black and white images, it’s more common to save this work until the processing stage. Until a a couple years ago Photoshop’s Channel Mixer was the preferred means of turning colour images monochrome, but now Adobe Camera Raw has more powerful tools (in the HSL/Grayscale tab) that allow you to adjust the brightness of eight individual colours that make up the image. It’s possible to adjust single of these colours to make it anything from white to black with the sliding control. However, it’s important to keep an eye on the whole image when adjusting a particular colour as crafty gradations could become unnatural looking. And adjusting the brightness of a red or pink shirt with the red sliding control, for moment , will have an impact on the model’s skin, especially the lips. The Levels and Curves controls should also be used to manipulate tonal range and contrast, but the HSL/Grayscale controls allow you to create discrimination between objects of the same brightness but with varied colours.

Dodge and Burn. Dodging and burning is a peculiarity that comes from the traditional darkroom and is usually used to burn in or darken highlights and hold back (brighten) shadows. Photoshop’s Dodge and Burn tools allow a level of control that film photographers should only hope of because you could target the highlights, shadows or mid-tones with both. This means that you should use the Burn tool to darken highlights when they are too bright, or the Dodge tool to perk up them to increase local contrast. It’s a good street of sharing a sense of better sharpness and enhancing texture. Plus, because you can set the opacity of the tools, you can build up her effect gradually so the impact is subtle and there are no hard edges.

Shoot RAW + JPEG. The greatest monochrome conversions are came upon by editing raw files which have the full colour information, but if you shoot raw and JPEG files simultaneously and set the camera to its monochrome picture Style/Picture Control/Film Simulation mode you get an indication of how the image will look in black and white. As numerous photographers struggle to visualise a scene in black and white, these monochrome modes are an invaluable tool that will help with composition and scene assessment. numerous cameras are also capable of producing decent in-camera monochrome images these days and it’s worth experimenting with image parameters (usually contrast, sharpness, filter effects and toning) to find a look that you like. Because compact mannerism cameras and compact cameras show the scene seen by the sensor with camera settings applied, users of these cameras are able to preview the monochrome image in the electronic viewfinder or on rear screen before taking the shot. DSLR users should also do this if they kick in their camera’s live thought procedure , but the usually slower responses mean that many will find it preferable or check the image on the screen post-capture.

Try Long Exposure. Long exposure shots can work really well in monochrome photography, especially where there’s moving water or clouds. During the exposure the highlights of the water, for example, are recorded across a wider area than they would with a short exposure and this may help enhance tonal contrast. The blurring of the movement also adds textural contrast with any solid objects in the frame. If required , use a neutral density filter such as Lee Filters’ Big Stopper or Little Stopper to reduce exposure and extend shutter speed (by 10 and 4 stops respectively). naturally , when exposures extend farther than in respect of 1/60 sec a tripod is wanted to keep the camera still and avoid blurring. It’s also advisable to use a remote release and mirror lock-up to minimise vibration and produce super-sharp images.

Look for Contrast, Shape and Texture. The complimentary and opposing colours that bring a colour image to life are all reduced to black and white or shades of grey in a monochrome image and you have to look for tonal contrast to make a shot stand out. In colour photography, for example, your eye would instantaneously be drawn to a red object on a green background, but in monochrome photography these two areas are likely to have the same brightness, so the image looks flat and drab straight from the camera. providentially , it’s possible to work adjust the brightness of these two colours discretely to introduce some contrast. However, a good starting point is to look for scenes with tonal contrast. There are always exceptions, but as a general rule look for scenes that contain some powerful blacks and whites. This may be achieved by the light or by the brightness (or tone) of the objects in the scene as well as the exposure settings that you use. The brightness of the bark of a silver birch tree for example, should inject some contrast (and interest) in to a woodland scene. Setting the exposure for these brighter areas also makes the shadows darker, so the highlights stand out even more. Look for shapes, patterns and textures in a scene and move around to find the unsurpassed composition.

Use Filters. Graduated neutral density (AKA ND grad) and polarizing filters are just as useful in monochrome photography as they are in colour. In fact, because they manipulate image contrast they are arguably more advantageous . An ND grad is collaborative when you want to retain detail in a bright sky while a polarizing filter could be used to reduce reflections and boost contrast. Alternatively, deem taking two or more shots with varied exposures to create a high dynamic range (HDR) composite. Don’t be afraid to use a ND grad with a standard neural density filter if the sky is brighter than the foreground in a long exposure shot. Coloured filters, which are an essential tool for monochrome film photographers, could also be useful for manipulating contrast in digital images. They work by darkening objects of his opposite colour while lightening objects of his own. An orange filter, for example, will darken the blue of the sky while a green one will lighten foliage.

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I am inspired by Mary Ellen Mark, the way she focuses on a specific project and takes photographs of people and places to tell their story. She has a huge body of work which is a testament to her skill and dedication for photography.

I shot the photo above at 7 a.m. The sun, barely over the horizon, aligned with one of the many alleys of the ancient bazaar in Isfahan, Iran. The place was deserted, with only the occasional pedestrian. Fifteen minutes later, the dramatic light would be gone and the place would be buzzing with people, products and LEDs.

The shots below, of a man brushing his teeth at a public fountain and a baby in a box at a market stand, are from the same walk to a market in Myeik, Myanmar.

Although interested from an earlier age with playing with the camera, I did not start to focus on my photography until 1998. I was stationed in Hong Kong at that time, and decided to travel to Beijing and Tibet. Once there I could not put the camera down and realized that I had found my true passion.

Documentary Photography: The Art of Capturing the World in Black & White with Chris Lettner

When is Black and White Not So Black and White? with Craig LaMere September 2, 2016 baby’s first year | free photography training November 13, 2012 Circle of Light: Understanding Light Placement and Position July 1, 2014

Most great documentary photos are the result of preparation, time and relationships. Street photography isn’t about luck; it’s about forcing chance. It’s not enough to have a camera on you. You need to go out of your way, get up early for the sunrise and stay up late for the action. Sometimes you might stand in the rain for hours on some street corner because the reflections are nice and it’s a great backdrop, but you have to wait for the right kind of protagonist to appear and complete the scene.

Biography, Conceptual, Documentary, Featured, Foot Binding, Interview, Jo Farrell, United Kingdom

The rest of these shots document a Moravian wine tasting at the Čevela family vineyard in Hodonín, Czech Republic. The damp cellar is lit by two lamps mounted on the ceiling, the kind you might find in a garage or a mineshaft. The plastic shades on the lamps give subjects’ skin an artificial, unhealthy-looking orange. Black and white resolves this problem, giving images a feel that corresponds to the bare, archaic space.

Jo Farrell is an award-winning black and white photographer and cultural anthropologist. Born in London, England she has been based in Hong Kong for the past seven years. Her photography work focuses on traditions and cultures that are dying out, including the project “Living History: Bound Feet Women of China.” She has been the recipient of numerous awards for her work on bound feet including a Jacob Riis Award, Black & White Spider Award, Center for Fine Art Photography and Women In Photography International winner juried by Mary Ellen Mark. She has had solo exhibitions in London, San Francisco and Hong Kong and has been included in group shows in New York, LA and Denver, Colorado. Her project has received critical acclaim and has been published internationally including The Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, BBC, CNN, Stern magazine, Time Out, Fast Co., International Business Times and the Sydney Morning Herald. In early 2015 she will be presenting her work at TEDxWarwick.

Keeping a distance is more polite and more comfortable, especially when you’re with strangers. But the closer you get, the better the pictures. I find it helps if you don’t come with a big DSLR, lights flashing and the sound of the shutter constantly going off.

The photo above is from a series that shows people’s emotions close up while they are experiencing the show of Prague’s Astronomical Clock. The show happens every hour, 12 times a day, and larger crowds gather each hour. Statues move about for 13 seconds. I enjoyed capturing the wonder in the faces of people oblivious to their surroundings as they watched, which makes this a prime spot for both photographers and pickpockets. I took the shot from about 4 feet away. If you want to ask for permission, you can always do that after.

I take most of my photos with the same fixed-lens Fuji X100S, occasionally switching to analog cameras or the even smaller and cheaper Sony DSC RX100, which almost fits in jean pockets. There are limitations in terms of image quality and versatility, but I’ve still never owned a DSLR.

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Where is your photography going? What projects would you like to accomplish?

The shot above is of members of a military band at a football game in Shiraz, Iran. My friend and I came across Hafezieh Stadium by accident, having followed the noise. Western visitors are rare, and when we walked in, the crowd gave us a warm welcome cheer. After taking photos with many people, we met Pourya, who spotted us in the crowd and invited us to the press stand. We spent the next week on an epic desert road trip with him and his 1979 Chevy Caprice he called Titanic, with its New York state number plates.

My long-term project, Living History: Bound Feet Women of China, originally took a lot of preparation to build the foundation of the work. In recent years, I often get on a plane to mainland China with only doing the basics—having my Hasselblad’s cleaned, purchasing film and contacting a translator to see her availability. Once I am there, every day is different and can only be coordinated once on the ground. The women in the project live in rural areas and cannot be contacted in advance. Often I have driven past a woman who has bound feet and have stopped the car to see if they will be included in the project. Finding the participants is word-and-mouth. Having been working on this project for some years, I know the angles I potentially want to take and it’s a matter of studying each woman and location to get their story.

As a teenager I was transfixed by 1940s, 50s and 60s movies filmed in black and white. They told stories through form, shape, texture, light and shadow. I used to collect stills from these movies. Black and white gives more depth to an image, more emotion and requires more use of ones imagination. So often I see colour photographs that just lack composition, without the colour they would be dull and boring.

I took the picture above through a window from the street in Budapest, Hungary. It shows a theater audience watching two actors onstage. The street serves as the backdrop; as the audience reacts to me taking pictures from outside, the actors start involving me in the play. Not everything can be planned.

In my first photography class in journalism school, our teacher asked us to carry a camera around with us at all times during the semester. I thought this was a bit extreme at first, but in the end, I was one of the only students who really tried. It made me look at the world in terms of motives, frames and potential pictures. It made me think about photography much more, and it forced me to practice. You never know what unexpected event or curious scene you might come across.

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Small cameras freak people out less and they are less heavy, so it’s easier to carry them around all day. They tend to raise fewer suspicions from bouncers, security guards and law enforcement, so it’s sometimes easier to get them into places, and it takes longer for you to be kicked out.

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In other words, sometimes it’s better to look more like a tourist than a professional.

Shooting real life, as opposed to in a studio or at an on-location shoot, you have little control over colors and lighting. Taking images for black and white can help deal with the difficulties of color composition on the street or in crowds, and in bad artificial lighting.

You have to be open and forward to realize the difference between taking photos at a cafe on Main Street and getting access to people’s homes, weddings or saunas. Make friends, build relationships and say yes if someone invites you along. Even if you don’t speak the language, you can usually get a long way with sign language and silly drawings. 

I have currently just self published a book and I am setting up talks in both London and Hong Kong. I am hoping my photography can reach a wider audience by being shown in major museums and galleries. I will continue my long-term project for many years to come. Meanwhile, I am hoping to start a new project that deals with other female traditions. Link to your website.

Most great pictures don’t just happen like that. I’ve taken a camera on countless hikes, nights out and trips to the supermarket, and most of the time I come home with nothing. Increase your chances of capturing great pictures by always having your camera on you.

How much preparation do you put into taking a photograph/series of photographs?

Documentary Photography: The Art of Capturing the World in Black & White Black & White Photography / Photography / Recently On Behind the Shutter

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