Black And White Prints From Colour Negatives

December 9, 2018 12:21 am by columnblogger
Image image
Monochromatic pictures on darkroom color paper
Black And White Prints From Colour Negatives

I have had pretty good luck printing from color negatives as well as cross processed e6. The times seem quite a bit longer than b+w, but once you get a good time there isn’t much mystery to it.From cross processed film

Too bad Kodak quit making the Panalure paper. Another problem is focus as you have 3 layers to focus with and all focus at a different level.This is one time where A scan is better with what the darkroom has to offer today. 91 months ago (permalink)

hi guys, just started shooting film. my first roll was developed and scanned by …

Another problem is focus as you have 3 layers to focus with and all focus at a different level.This is pretty funny, those layers together are thinner than a human hair, focussing a colour image is not a problem.So the weak point in the chain isn’t the 3 layers….If you want to print conventionally but have a colour neg, scan work in Photoshop get everything just as you like then convert to mono, invert then print onto a A4 clear acetate then contact print. Originally posted 91 months ago. (permalink) Photo Utopia edited this topic 91 months ago.

I’d think these layers that are seperate but so close together that focusing isn’t an issue. My enlargers aren’t precise enough to have any sort of problem with this.I’d use non-MG paper (multi grade) so you can control contrast, but otherwise, it is the same sort of procedure to making a normal print from b&w negs. 91 months ago (permalink)

Test test test. As Wayne said be careful of the film base.When running your tests, go beyond what you think you’ll need, I think my last B&W print from a color negative was around 50 seconds. I’d use graded paper as the color of the base may mess with the variable stuff. 91 months ago (permalink)

I’m sure there’s a thread here somewhere for it already, but flickr’s search engine sucks durian and I can’t find any, but has anyone here tried making B+W prints from color negatives? And if you have, do you have any tips? Thanks! 3:28PM, 10 February 2011 PDT (permalink)

i’m shooting with ilford FP4 125 ASA speed film, trouble is I can only set my ca…

As always no comment just the photos. Use your imagination and 2 per month.

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The orange base can be recreated with the panchromatic head or using an unexposed C41 frame. 77 months ago (permalink)

There are two or three problems with making B&W prints from C41 negatives:1) All black & white paper made today is orthochromatic (Insensitive to red light). Therefore, cyan parts of the image (red on the negative) will be white or nearly white on the print, and greens will be off because of the red transmission of the magenta dye. Kodak used to make a panchromatic B&W paper for making prints from C41 negatives, but it was discontinued.2) A black & white enlarger is not optimized for making prints from a color negative. The light source is not white enough, and the enlarging lens is likely not corrected for color aberrations.3) If you are using variable contrast paper, the colors of the negative will result in varying contrast and tonal scale for different parts of the image.If you are really, really serious about making traditional black & white prints from color negatives with an enlarger, your best bet may be to duplicate the color negative on to a panchromatic B&W copying film and print from that. 91 months ago (permalink)

They’ll work just fine. Things are a little different however due to the orange film base. I think you will be quite happy with the results however. It will take a little more exposure than your used to however. Just know that for your first time. 91 months ago (permalink)

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I’m getting ready to develop some PanF+ in Kodak d-76 1:1. I’ve done this befor…

I don’t agree with Joker, there is no problem focusing the three layers, at least not once you’ve stopped down two stops. And it doesn’t look like a scan at all. I think you will be surprised at how little grain there is compared to traditional black and white films. OTOH, you can forget about contrast control with multicontrast papers due to the thick mask. 91 months ago (permalink)

“Making color prints of b&w?”I’ve never tried, but you wouldn’t be able to easily change contrast, and because there is no color to the negative, you could only get an overall colour of the entire image. But you have full selection of what colour to “tint” it if you didn’t want B&W. Which I think should be possible even without the orange base the paper is designed for. 77 months ago (permalink)

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You will need to use a fairly contrasty paper. 91 months ago (permalink)

Wouldn’t a clear base lead to even greater problems with multigrade papers? Grass will be grade 4, skies will be grade 2. 91 months ago (permalink)

www.facebook.com/kodakprofessional/?hc_ref=ARTbf5_5ql0AhU…

> Making color prints of B&WTrue color using triple BW negatives: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergey_Prokudin-Gorsky#Gallery 77 months ago (permalink)

I use a standard VC paper for most of mine. Here’s an example with a link to a color scan. This was printed with a dichroic head (diffused light source as opposed to condenser). Perceived sharpness was lessened as a result. I suppose you could say I am a student of Kodak. I have never heard of any focus issue warning from them and they do cover B&W printing with colour negatives in several books I own that they have published.I haven’t noticed the issue myself. Are you sure that is what you’re experiencing? You call it a “problem” but I haven’t witnessed this problem myself. 91 months ago (permalink)

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I haven’t scanned much else, perhaps this thread will prompt me to do so. Originally posted 91 months ago. (permalink) .:Josh:. edited this topic 91 months ago. Luke H says:

“if I don’t like how the contrast is coming up, I’ll just try some contrast filters.”Contrast filters work by varying the blue / green levels of light hitting the paper. Your overall orange colour of your negatives will no give you the expected results. If any. The light coming through will be similar to what your OC safelight gives off. 91 months ago (permalink)

DX barcode numbers on 135 film (please contribute) 150 replies

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Has anybody tried the opposite? Making color prints of b&w? (and obtaining certain dominant colors) 77 months ago (permalink)

Most recentish 135 film has a DX barcode on the cartridge, usually with a six di…

This thread is for questions, experiences and tips relating to C41 and E6 home f…

OK Here is the place to put all your fine photos and gear I am going to make th…

Hmm… I have to admit I have no idea what and are talking about regarding contrast. I have variable contrast paper (unknown brand) and Polycontrast from Kodak. (I’m assuming ‘polycontrast’ is just Kodak’s brand name for VC), but if I don’t like how the contrast is coming up, I’ll just try some contrast filters. 91 months ago (permalink)

You can get great results with either wet printing or scanning. I must admit scanning and converting is a tad more user friendly. Originally posted 91 months ago. (permalink) Davy Mike edited this topic 91 months ago.

rollei digibase has a clear layer, if your looking for a new type of c41 film to wet print yourself. only downside is that the clear layer makes the film difficult to process in daylight, loading in camera and developemachine. 91 months ago (permalink)

I guess it’s all going to be a fun experiment then. =) inetjoker said:“This is one time where A scan is better with what the darkroom has to offer today.”Maybe so, but I’m willing to experiment. Sounds like fun to me 🙂 91 months ago (permalink)

Kodak used to make a panchromatic B&W paper for making prints from C41 negatives, but it was discontinued.Mmm, Panalure.But yes, failing that, making a panchromatic dupe neg is the only way nowadays you’ll get the colour response and contrast control you’re used to. 77 months ago (permalink)

We can’t pick one as we get so many in a day or even hour. So I Ask the memb…

I have done a C-41 to BW print once… I have some exposed image on a sheet of paper somewhere, hiding deep in the bowels of my black bag, but haven’t developed it yet. I do plan on doing that sometime this weekend!I used an Ilford #4 filter when doing it to try to draw out more contrast with it… 77 months ago (permalink)

Hello there, I’m in the hunt of a Canon RF, probably P or 7 with a 50mm or 35…

longer times. got it. Thanks, wayne 91 months ago (permalink)

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