Color Vs Black And White Film Photography

best black and white pictures Color Vs Black And White Film Photography

best black and white pictures Color Vs Black And White Film Photography

Digital black and white
Photographic filter
Unlike analog film photography where you would choose either color or black and white film before even touching your other camera settings in the digital
Black and white photography
Black and white photography
Have you taken the plunge into black and white photography yet unlike color negative film black and white film needs special attention when it comes to
Filter effects
I have shot as much color slide film as any other type so i was excited give the dr5 bw process a run all images were taken with my mechanical
Traditionally black and white photography has been a contrasty medium in color photography big contrast is often discouraged in the days of film
If this was in color youd have at least 4 colors in the background and middle ground elements alone excluding the colors of their clothing and bags
Wgiscans217
Those obtained with colour filters with b
Developing color film in black and white developer street wolf photography
Colour original black white copy the photographs
For example if you are photographing a woman wearing red lipstick it will be gray or black in black and white depending on the shade of red and intensity
Yellow filter the classic among black and white photographers blue skies are darkened which helps to increase the separation with the clouds
Photography · photoshop black and white
Rich herrmann photography the beauty of black and white
Black and white photo apps to elevate your monochrome game
5 old school film photography tips

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But is that a mistake? I think it is because black and white photography and color photography are two different mediums. If you are working in color, then you need to pay attention to the colors in the scene and how to use them to create an interesting composition. But in black and white, you need to pay more attention to textures, contrasts, and shapes in order to create a strong composition.

For example, this photo (below), taken in the Forbidden City in Beijing, makes use of the striking contrast between the red walls and the yellow tiles (matched by the boy’s shorts).

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For example, last year I visited Beijing and noticed that red is a very common color in that city. It denotes power and wealth and has an important part in Chinese culture. I realized that it is possible to create a series of interesting photos with red as the dominant color.

Many street and travel photographers, street photographers especially, chose to work in black and white. If your aim is to make a candid portrait that captures something of the person’s character or soul, then black and white is an excellent choice. There is something timeless about black and white that helps reveal character.

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Color photos can be tremendously evocative, but so can black and white ones. I think it’s because a black and white image leaves something for the imagination, or perhaps because we associate it with photos taken in the past. So, if you are working somewhere with lots of old buildings, then black and white photos can be a tremendously moody way of capturing the atmosphere of that place.

The question of whether to shoot street and travel photos in black or white or color is an eternal one that isn’t going to go away. But one of the interesting things about digital photography is that it lets you decide whether to process a photo in black and white or color after the photo has been taken. Unlike film photography, there’s no need to commit to one or the other until you open the photo in Lightroom.

Color film contains several layers, each sensitive to a different color of light (red, green, blue). When exposed to light and developed, these produce magenta, cyan and yellow colors in the negative. The printing process works in a similar way. This is similar to the way digital sensors work, in that there are filters to exclude all but one color of light, so that a receptor can record the intensity of just that color, and then the separate RGB values are combined into a single image.

Dusk and early evening are good times to work in color as it gives you the opportunity to work with the natural color contrast between the orange light cast by tungsten light bulbs and the natural blue color of the ambient light.

What is the difference between black and white film and color film? How does color film record color? Is it like black and white film with something more, or is it entirely different?

In terms of outcome, i would say the black and white films usually have wider latitude than color ones, which enables the black and white films to capture wider range of light. This is the major reason why there are photographers particularly preferring white and black films in certain creation – for better exposure.

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Color is very powerful and used wisely it can elevate your images to another level. Yet, if it is not used thoughtfully, it can take away from the impact of your photos.

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Because of the dye versus silver color and black and white film have different grain patterns and different expectations of longevity (the dyes would be more likely to fade if exposed to light regularly).

What do you think? Do you prefer to make street and travel photos in black and white or color? Let us know in the comments.

Black and white film typically has a single layer that responds to the all wavelengths of light and the negative that results has various densities between clear and black. There is no attempt to filter different colors, just to record the overall luminance.

If you are working in an area with lots of potentially distracting colors, working in black and white may be the way to go. For example, this scene in Bolivia was quite colorful, and I felt that black and white removed the distractions of those colors.

Black and white is a form of simplification. Skilled street photographers learn to create images that are uncluttered and that contain as few distractions as possible. Color can be extremely distracting, and sometimes it’s easier to ignore color completely and work in black and white.

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3 Reasons for working in black and white 1. To capture character

That’s on top of the task of capturing the expressive moments that the best street and travel photos reveal.

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The Pros and Cons of Black and White Versus Color for Street and Travel Photography

This photo below was taken in the early evening. The hat and t-shirt of the man in the foreground are colored blue by the ambient light outside, while the rest of the scene is lit by artificial light. I retained the orange color in post-processing to keep the atmosphere.

I chose black and white for this photo, taken in the Argentina, because the stirrup is handmade, and looks ancient, as if it were made many years ago.

Black and White film (specifically traditional black and white negative film) has a single layer of light sensitive silver halides, these halides are converted into silver metal during processing. Unexposed but developed film has a mostly clear color, instead of orange. The negatives also have their tones reversed, with darker areas appearing lighter.

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If you’re working in color, think about the colors present in the scene and how you can use them effectively. Your mind will engage and start looking more deeply at the colors around you.

I took this photo close to sunset. The light was soft and its warmth helped lift the scene.

If you enjoyed this article and would like to learn more about street and travel photography then please check out my ebook The Candid Portrait.

If you’re working in black and white, look for interesting textures, tonal contrast, and shapes. Again, once you commit your mind will start looking for compositions that work well in monochrome.

The process of deciding to shoot in black and white or color involves assessing the scene and the situation, and deciding which one to use, taking into account the reasons listed in this article and your personal preferences. The key is then to commit to the process. Work the subject and do your best to create the most powerful images possible.

For example, let’s say you make a portrait of somebody on the street, but there is a red poster on a wall behind them. In a color photo, that’s likely to be very distracting. But convert it to black and white and the distraction goes away. The viewer’s attention goes back to the person, where it belongs.

There’s a lot to think about, and as black and white and color photography require different mindsets, it’s a good idea to make the decision about which you are going to shoot before you press the shutter button.

Color photos are at their strongest when the light is beautiful. This is usually during the golden hour close to sunset, or early morning just after sunrise. The light at these times is warm and golden, and tremendously evocative. This could be a good time to work in color.

Color film (specifically C-41 processed color negative film) has light sensitve silver halides in red-sensitive, blue-sensitive and green-sensitive layers. During processing the silver halides are replaced (not 100% on the chemistry here) with dyes, which carry the color information (but as a reversal, and the film also has an orange base color)

Having said that, it is also helpful to think about the following factors when you are processing photos. It may be that you were working in color, but realize afterward that a particular image would work very well in black and white. The same considerations apply, except that you have more time to think about it.

Color Vs Black And White Film Photography