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Street Photography Black And White Vs Color.

Try Long Exposure. Long exposure shots could work really well in monochrome photography, especially where there’s moving water or clouds. During the exposure the highlights of the water, for example, are recorded across a wider place than they would with a short exposure and this may help enhance tonal contrast. The blurring of the movement also adds textural contrast with any solid objects in the frame. If compulsory , use a neutral density filter such as Lee Filters’ Big Stopper or Little Stopper to decrease exposure and extend shutter speed (by 10 and 4 stops respectively). typically , when exposures extend beyond apropos 1/60 sec a tripod is wanted to keep the camera still and avoid blurring. It’s also advisable to use a remote release and mirror lock-up to minimise vibration and produce super-sharp images.

Use Filters. Graduated neutral density (AKA ND grad) and polarizing filters are just as useful in monochrome photography as they are in colour. In fact, because they manipulate image contrast they are arguably more useful . An ND grad is collaborative when you want to retain detail in a bright sky while a polarizing filter could be used to reduce reflections and boost contrast. Alternatively, assess taking two or more shots with different exposures to create a high dynamic range (HDR) composite. Don’t be afraid to use a ND grad with a standard neural density filter if the sky is brighter than the foreground in a long exposure shot. Coloured filters, which are an essential tool for monochrome film photographers, could also be useful for manipulating contrast in digital images. They work by darkening objects of their opposite colour while lightening objects of his own. An orange filter, for example, will darken the blue of the sky while a green one will lighten foliage.

Shoot RAW + JPEG. The most excellent monochrome conversions are made by editing raw files which have the full colour information, but if you shoot raw and JPEG files simultaneously and set the camera to its monochrome photograph Style/Picture Control/Film Simulation mode you get an indication of how the image will look in black and white. As many photographers struggle to visualise a scene in black and white, these monochrome modes are an invaluable tool that will help with composition and scene assessment. numerous cameras are also capable of producing decent in-camera monochrome images these days and it’s worth experimenting with image parameters (usually contrast, sharpness, filter effects and toning) to find a look that you like. Because compact scheme cameras and compact cameras show the scene seen by the sensor with camera settings applied, users of these cameras are able to preview the monochrome image in the electronic viewfinder or on rear screen before taking the shot. DSLR users may also do this if they activate his camera’s live perceive rule , but the usually slower responses mean that numerous will find it preferable or check the image on the screen post-capture.

Take Control. Although coloured filters can still be used to manipulate contrast when shooting digital black and white images, it’s more common to save this work until the processing stage. Until a some years ago Photoshop’s Channel Mixer was the favorite means of turning colour images monochrome, but now Adobe Camera Raw has more powerful tools (in the HSL/Grayscale tab) that allow you to adjust the brightness of eight individual colours that make up the image. It’s possible to adjust single of these colours to make it anything from white to black with the sliding control. However, it’s important to keep an eye on the whole image when adjusting a particular colour as crafty gradations could become unnatural looking. And adjusting the brightness of a red or pink shirt with the red sliding control, for moment , will have an impact on the model’s skin, especially the lips. The Levels and Curves controls can also be used to manipulate tonal range and contrast, but the HSL/Grayscale controls allow you to create discrimination between objects of the same brightness but with varied colours.

Look for Contrast, Shape and Texture. The complimentary and opposing colours that bring a colour image to life are all decreased to black and white or shades of grey in a monochrome image and you have to look for tonal contrast to make a shot stand out. In colour photography, for example, your eye would instantly be drawn to a red object on a green background, but in monochrome photography these two areas are likely to have the same brightness, so the image looks flat and dingy straight from the camera. luckily , it’s possible to work adjust the brightness of these two colours discretely to introduce some contrast. However, a great starting point is to look for scenes with tonal contrast. There are always exceptions, but as a general rule look for scenes that contain some forceful blacks and whites. This may be achieved by the light or by the brightness (or tone) of the objects in the scene as well as the exposure settings that you use. The brightness of the bark of a silver birch tree for example, can inject some contrast (and interest) in to a woodland scene. Setting the exposure for these brighter areas also makes the shadows darker, so the highlights stand out even more. Look for shapes, patterns and textures in a scene and move around to find the greatest composition.

Dodge and Burn. Dodging and burning is a process that comes from the traditional darkroom and is usually used to burn in or darken highlights and hold back (brighten) shadows. Photoshop’s Dodge and Burn tools allow a level of control that film photographers can only thought of taking a degree of because you should target the highlights, shadows or mid-tones with both. This means that you can use the Burn tool to darken highlights when they are too bright, or the Dodge tool to perk up them to increase local contrast. It’s a good strategy of giving a sense of superior sharpness and enhancing texture. Plus, because you should set the opacity of the tools, you should build up his effect gradually so the impact is subtle and there are no hard edges.

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Here are some insights into my street photography essentials from equipment to ideasThe pros and cons of black white versus color for street and travel photographyStreet photography in india 50 stunning black white photos 121clicks comThe pros and cons of black white versus color for street and travel photographyThe pros and cons of black white versus color for street and travel photographyI was immediately drawn to rui palha photography because it was only in black and white as much as color can bring life to a photo sometimes having the the

With some images I can say color and it’s a easy decision making process, but with others I just don’t know what the hell to do at times. What I want to do is list the Pros of each. Truth be told I plan to work on my first book this second half of the month and keeping a similar tone in every image is extremely important to me.

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Choosing a color theme then you are out on a photo walk can be a fun project. Here my color theme was blue!

Autumn in Paris would not be as well conveyed in a B&W photograph.

People like color. If I dropped a photo book that was strictly color then chances are i would attract more people. B&W is for the serious consumer, that person is likely a photographer or someone who enjoys looking at photography, color may attract someone who’s interested in the scene. If the title of my book was Detroit Hero’s then they may pick it up simply because the saw Detroit, but the color pictures would likely prompt them to flip through more pages than B&W.

Here a B&W conversion would not make any sense and the subject would lose interest.

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Editor’s Note: This is last of a series of articles this week featuring black and white photography tips. Look for earlier ones below.

Over the last 2 years I’ve heard this statement several times. I’ve see it on Instagram, I’ve seen it on photography forums… Hell, I’ve probably recited it here once before, who knows. It’s one of those quotes that we all know, but choosing between the two isn’t that simple. As a person I know I don’t have to choose between the two, but as someone who believes in aesthetic I feel almost forced two.

When is color preferred? The color can be an integral part of the story, which also means that a black and white conversation would take away the most important component of the image, and it would not make any sense.

I’m not going to sit up here and act as if this isn’t an advantage. Editing in B&W is easier, it allows you to at times use photos that would be unusable in color. Some examples would be over-exposed images, out of focus images and images with noisy backgrounds. It’s okay to add a shit ton of shadows or vignetting to make your subject the only subject. I’m not saying the decision to use a B&W edit on your images will make the overall image better, just that it can make it useable. 

You may like to use black and white for its timeless quality. If your subject also has a timeless look, a black and white processing will make your image stand the test of time, and often give it a more artistic look. This is even more true when no element in your frame dates your photograph (such as mobile phones, cars, etc.). Other times, the black and white processing will even help hide those elements.

This short video about Color versus B&W is part of my Street Tips series called Hit the Streets with Valerie Jardin

Silhouette photographs are often stronger in black and white than in color. The human element featured should be well-defined, and there needs to be some separation to identify the shape of the body. Removing the color will help make your subject stand out more, especially if it is small in the frame. The eye will automatically be drawn to the human shape.

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By removing the color distraction it’s a much stronger image, bringing attention right to the subject.

First, let’s assume that you are shooting with a digital camera and the choice of color or monochrome treatment can be made at the post-processing level. The decision of choosing color or black and white if you are shooting film is a different story, and requires a different frame of mind, as it is usually made before you leave the house.

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Going out on a photo walk with a specific color in mind is also a fun way to approach street photography. You will be surprised at the creative ways you will see the world around you by focusing your vision on one color. Try it!

Don’t forget that it’s your vision, and you are shooting street photography for yourself first. Don’t get stuck, try new things! If you always shoot in color, go out and train yourself to see in grayscale for a few days. If you favor black and white, take another look at the world around you and learn to appreciate and use the colors it has to offer. You may discover a whole new way to see, and you will undoubtedly grow in the process. Have fun!

So, the questions is this: Is street photography better in color or black and white? There is no right or wrong answer to this question, it is definitely a personal preference. Some photographers only shoot in color, others prefer black and white for all their work. For my part, I let the subject dictate the choice and that decision is usually made before I press the shutter.

There are other times when the color is amazing but also overpowering, and risks becoming the subject because the human element is lost in the chaos.

So where does that leave me? Still confused I guess. The book I’m working on is just a documentation of my city. I want to showcase what stands out to me, rather that be people or places. Currently the majority of my work is edited in B&W, but I’d be lying if I told you that I didn’t enjoy looking at color myself. I’m interested in your take on this. What’s your editing process like? Are you more swayed to B&W or color? And Why? 

Color will also often give a sense of place or time in street photography. It will evoke the feeling of a season, for example, or the time of the day – from the warm glow of the golden hour, to the cool tones of the blue hour.

B&W will work best if your subject already has a timeless look.

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B&W is mostly associated with street photography. In the past color was looked at as an ametuer option. It was mostly used with disposable cameras and if you shot with it people just assumed you weren’t that skilled. Times have obviously changed now, but B&W is still the dominant choice when shooting in the street.

This will make it possible for me to continue to make content and explore my creative ideas.

It’s not often you see a full portfolio in color. However, when you do and it’s good you seem to respect it more. Photographers like Trent Park are known for using color and they are known for using it well. Bright reds, occasional greens, they work really hard to incorporate pleasing colors throughout each image… You have to respect that.

In this frame the subject is interesting but your eye is drawn to the colors of the street signs.

There are also some strategic reasons to favor black and white over color. As street photographers we usually do not remove elements from the frame in post-processing. Our job is to record an authentic moment in time, that never happened before, and will never happen again. A skillful street photographer makes quick decisions, and is able to remove distracting elements from the frame by moving in closer and positioning him/herself correctly, before pressing the shutter. Most of us would not resort to using post-processing tools to remove objects. There are times when bright colorful elements such as stop signs, trash cans, or cars are inevitable, and will draw the attention away from the subject. By removing the color, you are able to bring the attention back to the human element.

Daily Struggle: Black & White vs Color In Street Photography

Though B&W is the name brand, color is equally as popular, notably because it’s what we see as people. We can relate to it, everyone. Some of the biggest street photographers today have used color becuase it connects with the reader. When Ted said when you photograph in color you photograph the clothes, what he really meant was when you photograph in color you are looking to capture the entire scene and sometimes that’s what the majority of people want to see.

Note: This week is Black and White Photography Week on dPS and to celebrate we’re offering 50% off our Ultimate Guide to Black and White Photography eBook when you use the coupon code BW50 during check out.

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Finding a great background, such as a textured wall or a colorful storefront, is a great way to anticipate a shot, by waiting for the right subject to enter your frame. It may be even more important to get the right subject in a color shot than in a black and white picture. Color harmony plays an important role in making, or breaking the image. Most importantly, color should not overpower your subject. It should be part of the story, not a distraction from it.

Consistency plays a big part in my life. i believe things should be the same, every time, otherwise why do them the first time? Of course, there are exceptions, but for the most part I think we can agree that we want our body of work to have a similar feel. Editing in B&W definitely allows that to happen. What I like most about it is how consistent it is throughout the entire day. It doesn’t matter if you’re shooting at 6AM or 2AM, you’ll likely have a similar edit. This works great in a book or a nicely organized portfolio.

“When you photograph people in color, you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in Black and white, you photograph their souls!” — Ted Grant

By shooting in RAW you retain all the color information in your file, which allows you to play with the color sliders in Lightroom and turn a distracting color into a light or dark grey tone to fine-tune your final image.

Finding a textured colorful background and waiting for the right subject to enter your frame makes for a strong color street photograph. The green tires and blue shoes completed the shot.

It’s interesting when a photographer evokes emotion from a stranger, but it’s also interesting when I see pictures being taken in my local neighborhood or places in which I’m familiar with. I recently did a mini segment for fun at Wal-Mart, the images weren’t great but it was recepted well because people know those colors… they know those signs, had this been in B&W it may not have gotten any attention.

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